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Website Blogging Tips for Musicians

Blog platforms like Blogger and Tumblr are inexpensive, easy to setup and great if you have a lot to say about a certain topic. But is a blog the best format for you and your website? 

Hello and Goodbye…

Chartbeat, a web analytics service, discovered that 55% of 2 billion web visits in a month spent fewer than 15 seconds actively on a page which is a huge problem if the homepage is a blog.

As a musician, you want people to spend time exploring your site, listening to your music, reading your bio, and then clicking your contact form’s “send” button. Blog designs are meant to highlight blog posts and while blogs let you create pages to resemble static pages, you can’t shake the blog look and feel which makes your page look unprofessional if not properly designed.

Website builders like WordPress.org and Squarespace have themes designed to attract and maintain a visitor’s attention with effective homepage elements (see Kissmetric’s The Anatomy of an Effective Homepage).

 

When your Website should be a Blog

Only have a blogging website when you want to show that you’re an expert in a specific topic and you can regularly publish high-quality posts.

If you’re selling a reedmaking book, highlight different categories in different sections of your page - Cane Selection, Gouger Reviews, Shaper Reviews - and stay focused because you want people to buy your book.  Musician blogs often lack cohesion and read more like personal journals than self-promotional tools.  If your blog is about reedmaking, stick to reedmaking and don’t write about unrelated topics - you’ll lose readers.

Publish content-rich posts 1-3 times a week to entice Googlebot to crawl your site.  Anything less than that, your site enters the blogosphere graveyard (See Neiman Journalism Lab’s The Blog is Dead, Long Live the Blog).

 

Still want to Blog? Consider a Hybrid Homepage

Ideally, the most common homepage format is a static page and a blog.  Have Latest News posts about recent performances be next to your video and audio playlists.  What better way to keep visitors engaged than to watch or listen to you perform? 

Understanding when and where to use a blog on your homepage will make a big difference in how long visitors spend on your site and will hopefully improve your online presence.

About the Author

Lana Lee creates and upgrades websites for classical musicians. Her site is Woodwind Web Design. She holds a Bachelor’s of Music in oboe performance and a master’s in engineering from USC.


Further reading:

Manjoo, Farhad (2013, June). You Won’t Finish This Article. Slate.com